Helping Creative People Create

The Morning Tea Break: Making Better People out of Nurses

jamie cullum:it's about time
Creative Commons License photo credit: visualpanic

It’s no surprise that taking social breaks help nurses cope with their work.

The study employed an ethnographic methodology and found that the morning tea break ritual provided time, space and an environment where nurses can ventilate their feelings and gain each other’s support. Thus, the morning tea break ritual has positive contribution to nurses’ work and both nurses and patients are the beneficiaries of this ritual act.

Unfortunately the study is behind a pay wall, but just reading the abstract we can deduce that breaks are vital and a necessary part of coping with jobs.

We all have mental images of the highly-chatty and unproductive social butterfly. Yet maybe we uber-productites could take a page or two out the social handbook. Some of you have relayed that working at home has affected your personality, especially in terms of social interactions.

So my question to you is: What are you doing during your day to unwind and talk to someone? Not via Twitter or IM, but rather real face-to-face contact with a human being. I’m curious to see how many of us actually take a daily break to talk to a real person. Discuss! :)

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  • Andre_Kibbe

    Whenever I talk to someone face-to-face during what I designate as working hours, I invariably run down a rabbit trail. I can actually sense myself prolonging the conversation to avoid working. There are times when I willingly allow this to happen, but after seeing a pattern of procrastination, I changed venues in order to work anonymously. If I'm not in a crunch period, it's not a problem. I much prefer talking to people in the evening, when I can give them my undivided attention, know that I've accomplished what I've set out to do that day.

    In the case of nurses and other professional caregivers, it totally makes sense to seek out contact with less high-maintenance humans than patients or clients. Dealing with the irate or the suffering has got to be stress-inducing, so it's natural to commiserate with peers.

    • http://lifedev.net Glen Stansberry

      Good points, Andre. I prefer afternoon/evening social times as well, as I'm not nearly as productive in the evening. I mentally clock out around 3:30 :)

  • http://www.joelfalconer.com Joel Falconer

    I found myself avoiding human conversation in order to get more done, until I found that a ten minute discussion with someone (not using IM, but phone is fine – preferably face to face) actually changes my perspective and puts the rest of the day in a more positive light. Being more social has been a particularly good change for me since, as a writer, the way I'm feeling is reflected in my work and readers tend to pick up on it.

    The problem is, as Andre points out, your self-discipline in maintaining some boundaries and terminating the conversation at the appropriate point in time.

  • http://www.streamlinedmind.com Farfield

    I like to be able to talk to other people. It depends on what I'm woking on though. Sometimes when I'm teaching and I'm facing a problem with a lesson or a particular student, it's great to be able to take a few minutes to talk about it with a colleage. But the other moment when you really want to get some emails answered, you don't want that colleage to keep talking to you about unnecessary things.

    And when I'm working on my own projects it's the same. Sometimes it's great to get feedback from others and sometimes I just want to concentrate and not be disturbed. I do take quite some time to talk with people though, be it work related or social.

  • http://consciousflex.blogspot.com/ Nicholas (Conscious Flex)

    When I speak with people, I speak with a deep passion for life and trying to find the best parts of it. Therefore, I try to have a like-minded group of people around. In this way we can bounce off each others ideas. Bouncing off ideas leads to more cleverness in achieving your goals. Talk to someone who is interested, passionate, inspired, connected, and motivated to the same-things you are. People who do not share the same insight, will only drag you down. They will give you all the excuses that they give themselves, as to why you should not achieve your successful goals.

  • http://consciousflex.blogspot.com/ Nicholas (Conscious Flex)

    When I speak with people, I speak with a deep passion for life and trying to find the best parts of it. Therefore, I try to have a like-minded group of people around. In this way we can bounce off each others ideas. Bouncing off ideas leads to more cleverness in achieving your goals. Talk to someone who is interested, passionate, inspired, connected, and motivated to the same-things you are. People who do not share the same insight, will only drag you down. They will give you all the excuses that they give themselves, as to why you should not achieve your successful goals.

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